Herself's Houseplants

Over 110 houseplants specific care, tips, and help

Archive for the ‘Terrariums and Dish Gardens’ Category

Micro water gardens

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micro water garden

micro water garden

micro water garden

micro water garden

micro water garden

micro water garden

micro water garden

micro water garden

micro water garden

micro water garden

Underwater designs

Underwater designs

Underwater designs

Underwater designs

Underwater designs

Underwater designs

The Houston Garden Club flower show in 2007 had some great underwater designs, yesterday I attended a Woodland’s Garden Club talk on underwater designs, the photos are from both of these.

There were several versions of small water gardens. I’m not sure if its a new trend or something local to this area? I haven’t been living down here long.

These would be great little gardens for a desk or counter top. You might even add a fish.

You can buy these large glass containers cheap now. I see them at Walmart all the time. You can get water plants at any store that sells fish and fish tank supplies.

Things I learned:
- Round clear glass is best
- A design takes a complete thought and moves your eyes through it, while an arrangement is just pretty
- The water line is part of the design
- Oranges from Florida are dyed and will leak the dye into your water, California oranges are not dyed.
- Water magnifies every thing, use that to enhance your design

Written by Linda MacPhee-Cobb

November 13th, 2013 at 7:00 am

Kokedama hanging plants

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Komedama with vanilla orchid

Komedama with vanilla orchid

I’d seen the Japanese hanging plants potted in moss around the internet and have had them on my wish list for a few months.

I decided to try first with orchids, they are potted only in moss, and I have more orchids than places to put them.

I unpotted the vanilla orchid, and packed the moss into a tight round ball.

I picked up some thin wire and hooks at the craft store in the bead section, I wasn’t sure string would hold up well and I didn’t want to see the string. I wrapped the ball of moss containing the plant in wire until the wire held all the moss in place.

I attached two hooks, each to an end of an 18″ strand of thin wire, one I hooked to the ceiling, one to the moss ball.

The entire project took about 15 minutes ( not counting clean up ), cost was less than a dollar per Kokedama hanging planter

Supplies for Kokedama

Supplies for Kokedama

Next time I’ll use some wire closer in color to the moss and I’ll use a hook at the top only and just attach the hanging string directly to the moss ball.

For plants other than orchids you’ll want a ball of 2/3 bonsai soil or peat moss mixed with 1/3 clay inside of the moss.

Kokedama (moss ball/bonsai with out a pot) is a form of Japanese bonsai. Typically the plant is removed from the container, roots are trimmed to bonsai the plant and it is planted in a ball of bonsai soil wrapped in moss.

It is said to have originated in the Edo Era (1603-1868 ) in Japan. The moss balls were not hung up but sit in a shallow container or flat tray.

Part of what holds the ball in place are the plant roots, as the plant grows it will more tightly bind the soil ball.

kokedama phalaenopsis

kokedama phalaenopsis

Written by Linda MacPhee-Cobb

April 5th, 2013 at 10:52 am

Florescence Elements

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Florescence Elements flower show

At the Houston Florescence show this year small was in, small landscapes, small water gardens, and wreath shaped dish gardens.

( photos of the more traditional arrangements are Herself’s Houston Garden, Florescence photos

Written by Linda MacPhee-Cobb

April 21st, 2009 at 3:25 pm